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  2. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  3. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  4. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  5. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  6. Shop the high quality dining table and 6 chairs set online in Sydney. Discover our range of 7 piece dining tables & round kitchen tables.

  7. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  8. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  9. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  10. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  11. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  12. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  13. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  14. Autism Educators

    Bernadette has been working with our girls and son for a few years now and has been nothing but helpful and supportive through everything, no matter what we say it wouldn't be enough praise for these two lovely ladies
  15. Autism Educators

    Bernadette Beasley & Katrina Trist-Johnson are respected Autism Specialists with more than a decade of experience in the field of autism. Both have significant professional and personal understanding of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) both as teachers and parents of children with autism. As qualified and experienced educators within both the private and public school sectors, they have received recognition for their efforts in the field of autism achieving the Griffith University Academic Award at the Autism Centre of Excellence and National Aspect Award for services to the autism community. They are Located at: Office: (07) 3317 8360 Suite 21 Offices First Aspley Pty LTD. Mezzanine Level, Aspley Hypermarket 59 Albany Creek Road Aspley QLD 4034
  16. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  17. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  18. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  19. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  20. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  21. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  22. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  23. Welcome to AUTISM EDUCATORS. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

  24. Asperger’s syndrome is a neurological disorder in the family of autism spectrum disorders. Because every child exhibits a different set of symptoms, there is no precise checklist of behaviors that must all be present for a diagnosis. Instead, there are many behaviors that may be signs of Asperger’s syndrome. Here we’ve rounded up 10 of the common behaviors to watch for, as shared by moms whose kids have the condition. 1. Fixation on One Activity Many children with Asperger’s syndrome are preoccupied with a single or a few interests and focus on them for hours on end. As Circle of Moms member Karen R. shares: “The most common report from every parent I know . . . is that their kid fixated on something (their cars, their blue toys, their books) and played or attended [to] that thing for an outrageously long time.” 2. “Little Professor” Speech “Typically a child with Asperger’s sounds like a little professor,” shares one Circle of Moms member, Sheila D. “They tend to have advanced verbal skills, but due to the autism aspect of the syndrome they might seem fixated on a topic that they want to talk about all the time.” Children with Asperger’s syndrome may also speak more formally than usual for their age or prefer talking to adults. 3. Difficulty Reading Social Cues Social difficulties are another key sign of Asperger’s syndrome. Reading body language may be hard, as well as taking turns or holding a conversation. As Eliana F. shares: “Group work at school is also hard for him, as he does not understand waiting his turn or accepting others point of view.” Similarly, Colleen notes: “My son is very social, but he doesn’t engage in two way conversations. He just talks and talks.” As a result of their social difficulties, children with Asperger’s syndrome may seem isolated from their peers. 4. Need For Routine “Structure plays a big part in our lives now,” shares Wendy B. Like many children with Asperger’s syndrome, Wendy’s granddaughter needs routines. “Otherwise it is very confusing for her. So shower is at 8:30 p.m. Bedtime is at 9:30 p.m. Breakfast at 8:30 a.m., lunch at 12, supper at 6. You get the message, very structured. If I want to take her shopping, I start telling her a few days ahead — that way, it doesn’t upset her, but we still follow the same routine.” 5. Emotional Meltdowns “My boy tends to have meltdowns when he gets overwhelmed,” shares Circle of Moms member Ylice. She’s not alone: many children with Asperger’s syndrome can’t handle routines or plans going awry. Amanda B. describes it as an “inability to control emotions when things are ‘out of order.'” 6. Lack of Empathy Another sign of Asperger’s syndrome is a seeming lack of empathy for others. Jennifer B. explains that her daughter “has no clue that people around here have feelings or wants and needs. She’s kinda like in her own little bubble as far as that goes. She can be totally aloof, in the clouds.” 7. Can’t Understand Speech Subtleties Some people with Asperger’s syndrom have a hard time understanding speech tone, pitch, and accent. As Alice D. explains, they may take words very literally and be unable to understand sarcasm or jokes: “He doesn’t get jokes and things like that — he can’t tell if someone is kidding or if they are being serious.” 8. Unusual Body Language Other signs of Asperger’s syndrome include unusual facial expressions or postures, and either staring a lot at others or avoiding eye contact altogether. Dana W. relays of her brother with Asperger’s syndrome: “He would never ever look people in the eyes.” 9. Delayed Motor Development From handwriting to riding a bike, poor or delayed motor skills of many kinds could be a sign of Asperger’s syndrome. As Kim F. shares of her son, who was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome in the second grade, “He was not athletic and had poor motor skills. Couldn’t skip, gallop etc.” 10. Sensory Sensitivities Many children with Asperger’s syndrome have heightened sensory sensitivity. As a result, they can be easily overstimulated by certain sensations, whether it’s strong lights, loud noises, or textures. Jennifer B. notes of her daughter: “Even now she doesn’t like wearing some fabrics because of the way they feel. There are some sensations that she just does not like! Certain sounds, touches, etc.” If you think your child may have Asperger’s syndrome, many readers say that the best path is to get an expert’s evaluation as soon as possible. And don’t be discouraged! As Sheila D. wisely advises: “It is typical to be scared and nervous, but a diagnosis of Asperger’s is not the end of the road for your child. It is a tool that will help you to help your child navigate a very different path than his ‘neurotypical’ peers. Find a local support group. Get informed, and be the best mom you can be.” The preceding information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.
  25. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a condition that affects a person’s ability to interact with the world around them. ASD has wide-ranging levels of severity and varying characteristics. No two people on the autism spectrum are alike. The term autism spectrum disorder includes autism, Asperger’s syndrome and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PPD-NOS). ASD is a neuro-developmental disability thought to have neurological or genetic causes (or both). However, the cause is not yet fully understood and there is no cure. A person on the autism spectrum has difficulties in some areas of their development, but other skills may develop typically. ASD affects around 1 in 100 to 1 in 110 people of school age, with males being around four times more likely to be affected than females. People on the autism spectrum have difficulties in the two main areas of: social communication and interaction restricted or repetitive behaviours, interests and activities. Communication for people on the autism spectrum People on the autism spectrum often have difficulty with communication. They may have difficulty expressing their needs. Some people on the autism spectrum never develop language, while others might have good verbal language skills. For those who do develop language, they may have difficulties using appropriate grammar and vocabulary, and in constructing meaningful sentences. They may misunderstand words, interpret them literally or not understand them at all. Other people’s feelings and emotions can be difficult to understand. Social interaction for people on the autism spectrum People on the autism spectrum can find social skills and social communication very difficult. This may mean that they appear disinterested in others, ‘aloof’ or unsure of how to engage in social interactions. They may have difficulty using or interpreting non-verbal communication such as eye contact, gestures and facial expressions, or appear disinterested in the experiences and emotions of others. Establishing and maintaining friendships can be challenging for some people on the autism spectrum. Some people on the autism spectrum appear to be withdrawn and can become isolated – others try very hard to be sociable, but may not seem to get it right. There is a range of help available, including assessment, education programs and family support. Characteristics of ASD There is a range of behaviours commonly linked with ASD. These may include: language – absent, delayed or abnormal developmental patterns play – isolated, repetitive, a preference for predictable play, difficulty with imaginative play, such as pretending that a box is a boat or a stick is a horse body movements – stereotypical behaviour, such as flapping and toe walking, and other behaviours that may cause self-injury, such as hand biting restricted or obsessive behaviour – with favourite topics, objects, places, people or activities rituals and routines – these bring some order to chaos and confusion. A change to routine can result in the person displaying high levels of stress, anxiety or acting out tantrums – can be a way to express extreme confusion, stress, anxiety, anger and frustration when unable to express their emotions in another way sensory processing differences – difficulties processing certain sounds, colours, tastes, smells and textures. People may seek and avoid particular sensations. Some people will have difficulty with discriminating sensory information too, for example hot versus cold. Assessment for ASD There is no medical test for diagnosing ASD. ASD is diagnosed through observation by a multidisciplinary team of health professionals. Diagnosis of ASD in children ASD in children is diagnosed through observation by a multidisciplinary team of the following health professionals: pediatrician psychologist or psychiatrist speech pathologist. Some children will show signs of ASD by the age of two and will be diagnosed then. Other may be diagnosed when they are older. The earlier ASD can be diagnosed the sooner therapy can begin. Early intervention has been shown to improve outcomes for children on the autism spectrum. Diagnosis of ASD in adults It is not unusual for people on the autism spectrum to have reached adulthood without a diagnosis. Sometimes people will discover some information about ASD that makes them think ‘That sounds like me.’ They may then choose to talk to a health professional for a diagnosis, or they may not. You may choose to seek a diagnosis for suspected ASD if: you have been diagnosed with a mental health condition and/or intellectual disability during childhood or adolescence, but think that you may have ASD you have struggled with feeling socially isolated and different your child or another family member has been diagnosed with ASD and some of the characteristics of autism sound familiar to you. If you wish to seek an assessment for ASD, you can: talk to your GP – who may refer you to a psychologist or psychiatrist with experience in the assessment and diagnosis of autism talk to a psychologist with experience in the assessment and diagnosis of autism (you do not need a referral from your GP to see a psychologist). A psychologist or psychiatrist with experience in the assessment and diagnosis of autism will ask you about your childhood, and experiences at school and as an adult. They may also do some psychological or psychiatric testing. A speech therapist may also be consulted to assess your social communication skills. All of this information will be used to help make a diagnosis. If you are diagnosed with ASD, you may feel relieved to know why you feel or behave the way you do. A diagnosis may also help you and your family to understand and cope with the challenges you face. Education programs for people on the autism spectrum The educational needs of students on the autism spectrum vary greatly. Intensive, specialised programs may be desirable for some students, while other students may be suited to mainstream programs. It will depend on the student’s learning need. Family support for people on the autism spectrum The family members (parents and siblings) of someone on the autism spectrum are also likely to need some support. Having a child on the autism spectrum can have a significant effect on parents, who may react to the diagnosis in a variety of ways, including relief, shock, grief, anger and guilt. Feelings of stress, confusion and anxiety are also common in parents who are caring for a child on the autism spectrum. It can be valuable for parents to consider joining a support group or participating in counselling. No link between ASD and immunisation Any link between immunisation and ASD has been completely discredited. During the 1990s, concern in the community about a possible link between the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine and ASD was generated by the findings of research (known as the Wakefield study) conducted in London in 1998. The Wakefield study has since been discredited and withdrawn by the journal that originally published it. Dr Wakefield’s registration as a doctor in the United Kingdom has also been cancelled. Concerns have also been raised about thiomersal (also known as thimerosal), a mercury-based preservative used in some vaccines. Concern about child safety prompted researchers around the world to investigate any possible link between the MMR vaccine, other vaccines and ASD. Extensive research conducted globally for a decade did not establish any link between vaccines and ASD. Despite this finding, as a precaution, it has been withdrawn from the standard childhood vaccines in Australia and many other countries.
  26. About the Autism Spectrum

    Autism is a lifelong development condition characterised by difficulties in social interaction, communication, restricted and repetitive interests and behaviours, and sensory sensitivities. These behaviours often manifest in an intense and focused interest in a particular subject matter; stereotyped body movements like hand flapping and spinning; and an unusual and heightened sensitivity to everyday sounds or textures. People on the autism spectrum experience difficulties with social interaction and impaired and unusual verbal and non-verbal communication. The word spectrum reflects the wide range of challenges that people on the spectrum experience and the extent to which they may be affected. An estimated one in 100 Australians are on the autism spectrum; that is around 230,000 people. It is four times more common in boys than girls. The quality of life for many children and adults can be significantly improved by an early diagnosis and appropriate evidence informed treatment. Aspect supports people on the spectrum and their families by providing information, education and a variety of services aimed at meeting the specific needs of each individual.
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